Dry needling consists of the insertion of thin, sterile, stainless steel needles into trigger points in muscles. The needles are stimulated by twisting or moving the needle to elicit a twitch response.

The Role of Dry Needling

Many of our therapists use dry needling as part of treatment to assist with pain relief, loosen tight muscles, improve joint motion and help boost the body’s healing response after injury.

Conditions Dry Needling can Treat

-Headache and migraine
-Neck and back pain (reducing muscle spasm, pain relief)
-Shoulder pain – rotator cuff injury, bursitis, and impingement
-Tennis Elbow or Golfers Elbow
-Carpal Tunnel, De Quervains Synovitis
-Hip pain – bursitis, tendinitis/tendinopathy, pain management in arthritis
-Knee pain – pain management for OA or degenerative meniscal tears
-Ankle/foot – plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinopathy

Dry Needling FAQs

What is the difference between Dry Needling and Acupuncture?

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Dry needling is a more recently developed practice that aims to stimulate a muscular response via movement of the needle for a short period. Acupuncture is a component of traditional Chinese medicine that relies on the specific placement of needles, for extended periods, along meridian lines to release endorphins and stimulate the body's healing response.

Is Dry Needling Painful?

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Dry needling is not normally painful. Unlike a needle you may receive at the doctor, it will generally feel like a 'scratch', which is just the plastic of the needle tube, followed by nothing or possibly a 'thud' when a twitch response is stimulated. 

Depending on the technique used and amount of stimulation given, dry needling may leave you with a muscle ache for 12-24 hours after treatment. If this occurs you can manage your pain using heat and analgesics, as well as doing gentle stretching. If you have any concerns please contact your therapist.