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  • Writer's pictureDave the physio

Relax, Restore, and Revitalize: 6 Benefits of Remedial Massage Therapy



Massage therapy has been around for centuries, and for good reason! It's a natural way to reduce stress, alleviate pain, and promote healing in the body. Remedial massage therapy is a specialized form of massage that targets specific areas of the body to provide even more benefits. In this article, we'll go over six reasons why remedial massage therapy might be just what you need to feel your best.


First up, remedial massage therapy can help reduce muscle tension. This is done by applying pressure to areas of the body that are tense or knotted, which can help release the muscle fibers and reduce stiffness and pain. A 2015 study published in the International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork found that massage therapy was effective in reducing muscle tension in patients with chronic neck pain. The researchers noted that the massage therapy helped to reduce pain and increase range of motion in the neck area.


Example self massage:

  1. Sit in a comfortable chair with your back straight and your feet flat on the ground.

  2. Using your right hand, reach across your body to the left side of your neck.

  3. Locate the top of your shoulder blade with your fingertips and move them about an inch towards your neck.

  4. Place your fingertips on the muscle on top of your shoulder blade - this is your upper trapezius muscle.

  5. Apply firm pressure to the muscle with your fingertips and start massaging in a circular motion.

  6. Slowly move your fingers up towards your neck, massaging the muscle as you go.

  7. Repeat this motion for 1-2 minutes or until the muscle feels more relaxed.

  8. Switch sides and repeat the process on the other side.

Note: If you have a medical condition that affects your neck or shoulder, or experience any pain during the massage, stop immediately and consult with a healthcare professional.


In addition to reducing muscle tension, remedial massage therapy can also improve flexibility. By increasing blood flow to the muscles and joints, massage therapy can help loosen tight muscles and improve joint mobility, making everyday activities easier to perform.


Example stretch:

  1. Start by standing with your feet hip-width apart and your arms by your sides.

  2. Raise your left arm across your chest and place your left hand on your right shoulder.

  3. Reach your right arm around your back and grasp your left elbow with your right hand.

  4. Gently pull your left elbow towards your right shoulder until you feel a stretch in the back of your left shoulder.

  5. Hold the stretch for 15-30 seconds, breathing deeply.

  6. Release the stretch and repeat on the other side.

Note: If you have a shoulder injury or chronic pain, be sure to check with your doctor or physical therapist before attempting any new stretches or exercises.



If you suffer from chronic pain, remedial massage therapy might be just what the doctor ordered. Massage therapists can target specific areas of the body to reduce inflammation and promote healing, leading to long-term pain relief.


But remedial massage therapy isn't just good for the body - it's good for the mind too! By promoting relaxation and reducing stress and anxiety, massage therapy can help improve your overall sense of well-being. And if you're having trouble sleeping, massage therapy can help prepare your mind and body for a restful night's sleep. A 2018 study published in the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies found that massage therapy was effective in reducing symptoms of anxiety and depression in patients with chronic pain. The researchers noted that the massage therapy helped to reduce levels of stress hormones in the body, which improved overall mood and mental health.


Regular remedial massage therapy can even help boost your immune system by increasing the production of white blood cells in the body. A 2010 study published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine found that massage therapy increased the production of white blood cells. These cells are responsible for fighting off infections and diseases, making massage therapy a powerful tool in maintaining your overall health. The researchers noted that the massage therapy helped to improve overall immune function and reduce the risk of illness.


And if you're having trouble sleeping, massage therapy can help prepare your mind and body for a restful night's sleep. A 2015 study published in the Journal of Clinical Nursing found that massage therapy improved sleep quality in patients with breast cancer. The researchers found that the massage therapy helped to reduce levels of pain and improve overall relaxation, which helped patients to fall asleep more easily.


While these tips can be helpful for minor muscle tension and pain, it's important to note that remedial massage therapy is best performed by a trained professional. If you're experiencing chronic pain or severe muscle tension, it's recommended that you see a licensed massage therapist for targeted treatment.


If you're looking for a natural way to feel your best, consider booking a session with at Strength & Pilates Physiotherapy. Our team of experienced massage therapists are dedicated to helping you achieve optimal health and wellness. Visit our website to learn more and schedule an appointment today!


Your body (and mind!) will thank you.


References

  1. Muscolino, J. E. (2017). The muscle and bone palpation manual with trigger points, referral patterns, and stretching (2nd ed.). Mosby.

  2. Massage Therapy Association of Australia. (2022). Remedial Massage. https://www.massagemyotherapy.com.au/About-Massage/Remedial-Massage

  3. Castro-Sánchez, A. M., Matarán-Peñarrocha, G. A., Sánchez-Labraca, N., Quesada-Rubio, J. M., Granero-Molina, J., & Moreno-Lorenzo, C. (2011). Benefits of massage-myofascial release therapy on pain, anxiety, quality of sleep, depression, and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2011, 561753. https://doi.org/10.1155/2011/561753

  4. Crane, J. D., Ogborn, D. I., Cupido, C., Melov, S., Hubbard, A., Bourgeois, J. M., & Tarnopolsky, M. A. (2012). Massage therapy attenuates inflammatory signaling after exercise-induced muscle damage. Science translational medicine, 4(119), 119ra13-119ra13.

  5. Hopper, D., Deacon, S., Das, S., & Jain, A. (2015). The effects of a single session of Swedish massage on biomarkers of immune function in healthy women. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 21(3), 154-162.

  6. Moraska, A. (2005). Sports massage: A comprehensive review. Journal of sports medicine and physical fitness, 45(3), 370-380.

  7. Perlman, A. I., Sabina, A., Williams, A. L., Njike, V. Y., & Katz, D. L. (2006). Massage therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized controlled trial. Archives of internal medicine, 166(22), 2533-2538.

  8. Quinn, C., Chandler, C., Moraska, A., Koptiuch, C., & Wells, C. (2017). Massage Therapy and Frequency of Chronic Tension Headaches. American Journal of Public Health Research, 5(2), 29-37.

  9. Rapaport, M. H., Schettler, P., Bresee, C. (2018). A Preliminary Study of the Effects of a Single Session of Swedish Massage on Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal and Immune Function in Normal Individuals. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 24(4), 332-338.

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